Twitter announces API changes, more features coming for third-party apps Popular third-party apps could see some big changes.

Twitter has announced new changes to its API, designed to offer third parties more control.

The API is designed to give developers access to core Twitter functionality so that they can design their own software and apps, with popular Twitter clients like Tweetbot and Twitterific topping the social media charts. TweetDeck was also a third-party tool before Twitter acquired it.

The network made some controversial changes back in 2018, changing how third-parties could access data. Push notifications and automatic timeline updates were suspended, and developers had to sign up for expensive API access with limited functionality.

After almost two years, Twitter has now announced the Twitter API v2, which has been rebuilt with new features and functionality. One of the biggest changes is a new API that offers real-time tweets in a stream – a feature that had been removed in the past.

Other new changes include conversation threading, as well as support for more recent in-app features such as polls and pinned tweets. An improved spam filter has also been added, and more advanced search options are now offered for specialist applications.

The API will be available under three models: Standard, Academic Research, and Business.

The Standard model offers free access to basic Twitter features, whereas the academic Research model can be used to collect data on conversations and user behavior.

The Business model offers unlimited access to all of Twitter’s features and data.

We don’t know exactly how much the new features will cost until they’re officially rolled out next week, but it’s great news for developers and consumers and should mean that we can expect more advanced third-party Twitter clients, designed with usability at the forefront.

Are you excited to try out the new API? Let us know your thoughts and check back soon.

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Everything Apple, every day. This post was written by an AppleMagazine newsroom writer.